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SABRINA GARBA | 100 BLK WOMEN | #2

An in-depth conversation on breaking down multicultural barriers








Sabrina Garba, an intercultural researcher and developer, leads over 2,000 global intercultural experts in developing and executing intercultural training that helps people from different cultures work together to increase efficiency...

“As women, we are everything”, says Garba, “There are no limits to who we are.”



SABRINA GARBA | 100 BLK WOMEN | #2

As Black Women, we spend a lot of our time explaining and translating who we are. For centuries, we’ve had to raise our voices to be heard a little more and we’ve had to shine a little brighter just to be be seen. This norm has been the standard for years, perpetuating itself through our jobs, careers and other engaging platforms. Everywhere, from entertainment, and medicine to teaching and manual labor these norms haver served as restricters for many Black Women, especially in corporate America.


Sabrina Garba, an intercultural researcher and developer, leads over 2,000 global intercultural experts in developing and executing intercultural training that helps people from different cultures work together to increase efficiency. A Howard University graduate, Garba is a master at training others in how to become cohesive with other cultures.


As we live during a time that shows how society reaps the harvest from our paining labor, we are feeling a rise in those who want to take from black culture without providing anything in return. Many just want the swag without the struggle.


“[It’s like], they want our body, but not our brain”, says Garba, when discussing the vouching done against the black female culture. We've seen women of different races cave and tan their bodies to look ours but none of them actually want to live the life of the women they portray.


“As women, we are everything”, says Garba, “There are no limits to who we are” .

The endless amount of life and love that oozes through this nation, was born through our very flesh and bones.


“There's this myth of the strong Black Woman and that’s not who we are” says Garba, “ we are the women who carried this nation, who have raised the babies of our slave owners, just from them to rule over us. For some reason there is this strong need for us to carry this nation on our bosom, just for us to be rejected.”


Through every walk and facet of life, Black women have been deemed last. Its of no consequence why we are the most disenfranchised people on the world. Even with such, we still manage to prevail.

“We can make a way out of noway,” explains Garba, “we are creative and resilient and in a common way, we are alchemist.”


The resilience and abundance we feel as women of color stems from the women who came before us. The unique details in there stories become ours, weaving us deeper together.


“My first example of a woman was my mother. She had her own unique struggles with mental health and power struggles of life, so she did what was best for her life and her future.” expresses Garba. “I think that it was her spirit and her influence that taught me how to be the bad-ass I am today, and how to connect with my community.”


It was through her mothers wit and brilliance that she was able tolerant how to be independent. In addition to Garba’s mother, she states there were two other women that assisted in her growth and development has a Black Woman; all three sharing different role helping to create who she is today.


Those three women would help raise Garba into womanhood, teaching her what it means to be a woman.


“ It wasn’t until I was around the age twenty-eight, that I believe I reached a point in my life where I could describe myself as a woman”, says Garba. “It was at that time that I began carrying myself and my head differently, even my choices were different.”

It’s this level of growth and thinking that will allow us to progress and move forward as Black Women.


Garba states, in order to reach this level of unity we must first be sure as to who we are as an individual. Many of us pass judgement upon meeting someone similar, Garba urges us to do so not at he sake of a white man or woman telling us to do so, but simply because we want to.


“Black Womwn are currently in an incubation sate, and theres this hype around what it means to be a black woman, and I think that together we can further work through those barriers and solidify what it actually means” says Graba.


With the acceleration of social media and other platforms of communication, we are now able to feel closer and more unified than ever. This movement, has allowed Garba to provide with the opportunity to grow and communicate multiculturally. By destroying the barriers and obstacles, we are allowing not only ourselves but others the opportunity to be seen and heard.


“My purpose s to give women the space to be themselves, and to be heard and seen,” says Garba, “My role is intended to provide Black Women with a place of no judgement, a way to grow and awareness of who you are.”


As Garba continues to reach new communication heights using glass ladders, she is providing endless opportunity for the women within her community.

“I want to give women a platform to grow no matter who they want to be” said Garba.

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